The Gender Equality Movement

All inclusive gender equality, not one-sided hypocrisy

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Can Men Be Feminists?

Posted by Curt on Wednesday, 7 July 2010

This might seem like a silly question; at least it did seem so to me.  In the past I always thought that of course men can be feminists, what exactly excludes men from being feminists?  Even I thought of myself as a feminist at one point.  Of course, Finally Feminism 101 is bound to be full of surprises for those not wholly familiar with feminism:

“However, [while there are men who are comfortable with calling themselves feminist and feminists who embrace them] there are also men and women who are ideologically uncomfortable with men calling themselves feminists, because it seems to be a co-option of movements built by and for women. These groups express a preference for the terms pro-feminist or feminist allies when speaking of men who support and advocate feminism.”

Shocking, no?  It might be if you know little else about feminism.  From my experience, a number of people who do not know very much about the nuances of feminism often envision it as simply a movement for gender equality and thus will claim the label casually or at least support it without very much thought.  Indeed, that was exactly my case until I came head-to-head with this sentiment some four of five years ago and realized that it ran much deeper than any notion of “regular” vs. “radical” feminists (not to mention the fallacy in dividing feminists in such a manner). Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Feminism | Tagged: , , , , , | 5 Comments »

Computer Issues

Posted by Curt on Monday, 5 July 2010

The post for today is going to have to be delayed until later tonight.  While trying to edit some of the system files in my computer, I accidentally hit a major glitch that causes every executable to open in Notepad after opening so many of those applications in that.  Typical file association error.  I tried everything I could, including editing the registry editor where you’d edit what .exe files are associated with by default, but nothing worked.  Rather than waste more time, I simply did a full system restore.  Now I’m having other issues, such as trying to activate my Windows since it doesn’t seem to recognize its being activated before and refuses to accept my product key for it.  So after all that madness, give me some time.

Update: I never did get the Windows activation issue solved.  NEVER buy that limited time student upgrade Microsoft offers when a new version of Windows comes out – the product key itself will expire when the offer ends and they aren’t willing to help you get it to work.  Total scam.  Consequently, I was never able to get this post up, so let’s just skip it.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Is Feminism Ripe for a Fourth Wave?

Posted by Curt on Friday, 2 July 2010

There’s been a lot of talk going around lately about this new Fourth Wave of feminism.  I must admit that I am not a very big fan of this Wave model of feminism – it seems like it’s only counted as a “Wave” as soon as it becomes the prevailing feminist view in academia.  But nevertheless, it’s the terminology most widely used when talking about feminist history and most generally agree with Jen Nedeau’s characterization of the waves of feminism thus far:

“If the First Wave was about access, the Second Wave about equality and the Third Wave about diversity – what will the Fourth Wave be about?”

Good question.  I’m not the only person out there who’s came to the conclusion that feminism, as it currently exists, by itself is no way to achieve gender equality yet is not anti-woman or a traditionalist, even if I arrived there for different reasons.  However, unlike me, there’s a number who do not appear willing to give up the label of feminism; rather, they seem to be trying to co-opt it for their own agenda.  You’ll notice many conservatives trying to do this exact thing and call themselves “Fourth Wavers”.  They may be politically motivated, but it doesn’t undercut the main point they’re making, the one that I think truly matters: that the Fourth Wave will be about inclusiveness. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Feminism | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

The Distortion that is Rape Culture

Posted by Curt on Wednesday, 30 June 2010

This joke is an example of rape culture.

In my last post, I said I was going to get around to talking about rape culture, and indeed, this isn’t the first time it was brought up.  Rape culture is no simple matter; it’s complicated to the point where I cannot easily discuss it without devoting an entire post to it.  Thus it is time that I addressed it.

Finally Feminism 101 has a post regarding rape culture.  The definition they provide, which comes from the book Transformation a Rape Culture, is as follows:

“A rape culture is a complex of beliefs that encourages male sexual aggression and supports violence against women. It is a society where violence is seen as sexy and sexuality as violent. In a rape culture, women perceive a continuum of threatened violence that ranges from sexual remarks to sexual touching to rape itself. A rape culture condones physical and emotional terrorism against women as the norm.

In a rape culture both men and women assume that sexual violence is a fact of life, inevitable as death or taxes. This violence, however, is neither biologically nor divinely ordained. Much of what we accept as inevitable is in fact the expression of values and attitudes that can change.” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Critical Theory, Domestic Violence, Rape | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

My Take on the Feministe Post “Jesus was such a cockblocker”

Posted by Curt on Monday, 28 June 2010

Last Saturday, guest blogger Erica wrote on Feministe about the experience of a woman she knows who dated a devout Catholic guy named Scott, who believed that sex outside marriage is a sin.  The narrator of that piece did not believe so and desired sex with Scott; so much so to the point that she was nagging and pressuring Scott to have sex with her.  Scott eventually gave in and they did wind up having sex, but with certain conditions that annoyed the narrator.  The sex ultimately turned out to be very short and disappointing to the narrator, to the point that she ridiculed him and, after breaking up, his newfound wife and (rather large) family.  The ultimate point of this piece was to demonstrate that religion, specifically Christianity, poses unnecessary restraints for sexual freedom.

While that ultimate point may have been well taken, the post generated a fair bit of controversy.  Many Feministe commenters claimed that the narrator of that piece essentially raped Scott through coercing him to have sex with her and questioned her sexual ethics (or lack of), which you can safely assume they would say the same thing if the genders were reversed.  Erica wrote another post responding to the argument that arose in the comments where she defended the narrator’s character, claiming that yes while the narrator’s sexual ethics were not the best, she was young and inexperienced, ultimately emphasizing that the most important thing was for her to come out and be open and honest about her experiences.  It was basically a call to hate the sin but love the sinner, which some commenters found inexcusable. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Domestic Violence, Rape | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »